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01 / 05
Global Figures Reveal Big Win for Rhino Conservation

The Guardian | Conservation & Biodiversity

Global Figures Reveal Big Win for Rhino Conservation

“Figures released by the IUCN African Rhino Specialist Group, the conservation body, indicate that the global rhino population increased to about 27,000 at the end of last year, with southern white rhino numbers increasing for the first time since 2012, from 15,942 at the end of 2021 to 16,803. In 2021, the world’s rhino population was estimated to be 26,272.”

From The Guardian.

BBC | Conservation & Biodiversity

Near-Extinct Crocodiles Make Comeback in Cambodia

“Cambodia has welcomed 60 baby Siamese crocodiles – a hatching record for the endangered species in this century, conservationists say…

Siamese crocodiles were once widespread throughout much of South East Asia.

But decades of hunting and habitat loss have tuned them into what conservations classify as ‘critically endangered’ species. There are just 400 of them left in the world – and most of those are in Cambodia.”

From BBC.

Canary Media | Energy Production

A Solar Microgrid Will Directly Power an Industrial Plant

“Titanium Metals Corporation, or Timet, recently began construction on a facility that will melt titanium to be shaped into parts for airplanes and other uses. Just next door, BHE Renewables is preparing to install arrays of solar panels and large battery systems, which will form a solar microgrid that connects to the titanium facility. Both companies are part of Berkshire Hathaway, the conglomerate run by Warren Buffett.

The project is perhaps the first to directly power a large industrial facility using solar-plus-storage technology. Developers say they hope the setup can serve as a model for future manufacturing plants — especially as the United States ramps up domestic production of electric cars, solar panels, batteries, and the steel, aluminum, and other essential materials used to make them.”

From Canary Media.

The Guardian | Conservation & Biodiversity

Wildcats Born outside Captivity in Cairngorms a “Major Milestone”

“The birth of wildcat kittens in the Cairngorms national park has been hailed as a ‘major milestone’ in efforts to rescue the secretive mammals from extinction in the UK.

In footage exclusively shared with the Guardian by the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS), two of the kittens can be seen playing in grassland with their mother and leaping on to a fallen tree branch.

These are potentially the first wildcats to be born outside captivity in Scotland for more than five years after 19 wildcats, which had been bred at the Highland wildlife park, near Kingussie, were released last summer in sites across the Cairngorms in a pilot project by the Saving Wildcats partnership, led by RZSS.

It was the first time a predatory mammal had been deliberately reintroduced in the UK after a landmark report in 2019 concluded the Scottish wildcat population was close to being functionally extinct. This was because of population decline caused by loss of native woodland and human persecution, and interbreeding with feral and domestic cats.”

From The Guardian.

BBC | Conservation & Biodiversity

New Tech Aims to Keep Polar Bears and People Apart

“Polar bears now spend more of the year on land, as Arctic sea ice melts, so conservationists are increasingly concerned about bears and people coming into contact.

The tracking tags, which have been tested on bears in Canadian Arctic, could help prevent those encounters, by ‘keeping a remote eye’ on the bears…

In communities in the southern Canadian Arctic, where the scientists tested these tags, polar bears that wander too close to a community are sometimes caught, transported and released in carefully selected sites away from towns and villages.

‘These tags could be fitted to those bears to monitor where they are after they’ve been released,’ explained Mr Ross.

‘If they’re coming back towards the community, conservation staff would have a sense of where they are, and they could head them off. I think that’s where they offer considerable promise.'”

From BBC.